Shedding The Baggage: Be Like Jesus

IMG_2981“(I)s the Christian view of the world to be optimistic or pessimistic? If it is essentially evil, then creation is to be beaten into submission to the will of God. If it is good, then it is to be worked with and honoured as something sacramental, in which we can see the hand of the one who created it.”
—John Finney, in “Recovering The Past – Celtic and Roman Mission.”

I came to faith in Jesus in 1979 at age twenty four. My spiritual journey from that point was rooted in evangelicalism, first in a baptist church, but the first church I was really involved in was much more Charismatic. I was placed in a leadership role, which is to say the pastor attempted to remake me in his own image. He was Calvinist, and trained me in that way. So, like most evangelicals, I developed a strong sin consciousness. My radar was tuned to immediately pick up not only sin, but that even more dastardly enemy, heresy.

Many, many years I continued in that state, until I came across a monthly newsletter 131292193_11nthat a friend of mine subscribed to (newsletters still came in the mail in those days) which was filled with four pages of various heresies du jour. I devoured that newsletter and subscribed to it myself.

After several months, I began to get uneasy. All this ministry did was sniff out what they considered to be heresies. Besides the fact that some of the beliefs or practices they found heretical I found to be biblical, I began to wonder; in the day we all stand before God, will this fault finding be accounted to them as good fruit?

It’s strange to me now to think that it took me so long to see the parallel between such a mindset and that of the Pharisees of Jesus’ day. But that was not the end of my sin consciousness. It continued for many more years. It began to crumble around 2006 and the dismantling picked up speed when I began doing formal evangelism the following year. I had already begun to see that identifying and pointing out faults in others was not helpful. I began to be exposed to people who believed what is, for Jesus people, possibly the most inarguable truth about humanity – that we are all created in the image of our Maker – and their approach to evangelism was to identify what looks like God, whether in individuals, communities, institutions, etc., and focus on it. Because what you focus on, you magnify. If you focus on the negatives in your spouse, they will multiply. If you focus on the positives, they will multiply.

That which looks like God, in an individual etc., is called the Imago Dei – the image of God. There is nothing under the sun which does not carry something of the Imago Dei, even if it’s only a speck, even if I can’t see it – and if I can’t, perhaps there’s something wrong with my “eyes”.

The “total depravity” of man taught by Calvinists had completely dissipated from my belief system. What a relief to learn that I myself am not totally depraved!

I have just finished listening to a YouTube Christian radio program featuring several people who have either been to or are interested in the phenomenon of “transformational festivals”, like Burning Man. As someone who ministers in those settings, I found it pretty refreshing. They are truly seeking to understand everything they could about the subject, and they actually know a lot. They were generous and loving in their remarks about the events themselves and about the people who attend. Even so, there were those vestiges of the evangelical sin consciousness evident in their language.

I understand fully how deeply ingrained these attitudes are, so I have no desire to be critical of those people. My purpose in mentioning it is that I wish, hope, and pray that we can break the habit. It has always been the offspring of a bad theology, which I myself have only escaped through grace. But it is more crucial to shed this baggage, which generations before us have laid on our well-meaning shoulders, at this very exciting, post-modern, post-Christian time in history. As Jesus followers (and, sad to say, not all Christians are Jesus followers), we have much to offer a rapidly changing world. But not if we keep trying, even inadvertently, to lay burdens on people we ourselves have failed to bear. Therefore, we must first unburden ourselves.

“(I)s the Christian view of the world to be optimistic or pessimistic?” If we have any trust in God at all, optimism can be the only answer, and the world, and people in it, we must treat with honor, and we must recognize the hand of their Creator in them. Trust me, it is there. It is always there.321092_10150295591436641_576766640_8236307_1685146041_n

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My Year In Review, Looking Ahead

14908174_1264232993619087_734515713576603394_nWith just one outreach left for 2016, another year of doing dream interpretations, spiritual readings, inner healing, and trying to love people as Jesus did – and does – is almost over. I’m already planning for next year. As best I can remember, these are the outreaches I did this past year:

February: Body, Mind, Spirit Expo. A New Age event in Raleigh, NC.
March: Another New Age fair in Raleigh, the name of which I don’t remember.
May: Burning Nest, a Burning Man sanctioned transformational festival, otherwise known as a “regional Burn”, in Port Talbot, Wales.
June: How The Light Gets In, a music and philosophy festival in Hay-on-Wye, England,
followed by the Summer Solstice festival at the Stonehenge Campground and at Stonehenge near Amesbury, England.
July: The Wild Goose Festival in Hot Springs, NC
August: Three Days of Light, a transformational festival in Ferguson, NC.
October: Haunted Happenings, a month long Halloween celebration in Salem MA.
Upcoming in November: Health and Wellness Weekend, a three day, mostly New Age fair in Lyons Falls, NY.

I worked with various teams of amazing people at each of these. My plan is to repeat all of them and add at least two more besides: Transformus, a regional Burn near Asheville, NC; and, a possible return to Burning Man after a hiatus from that festival this year. I may also add one or two festivals in the UK as well. I have new ideas for some of these, primarily the transformational ones, that I’m pretty excited about. For several of the festivals I go to, I join with Papy Fisher, and his amazing group of young people that he has discipled. Papy always adds hospitality, usually in the form of food, to the mix of ministry. The increase in effectiveness this adds can’t be overstated: It’s invaluable to forming meaningful relationships with people, and that’s really what ministry is all about.

IMG_3443Festival ministry isn’t easy. It’s a lot of work, it’s kind of expensive and the festival environment isn’t for everyone. You have to be a little tough, and more than a little crazy and wild, and though we tend to be willing to work alongside anyone who wants to be a part, there are those I personally have discouraged from getting into it. There are pitfalls and temptations and we have suffered a few casualties over the years. But we’re always on the lookout for good, tough recruits, or seasoned veterans to join us.

Festivals are changing the world. There is a huge number of festivals all over the world, and yet the Church either ignores them or is completely unaware of them. That’s probably a good thing, since being crazy and wild isn’t exactly encouraged in the church, generally speaking. Maybe you’re crazy and wild enough. If so, let’s talk. Maybe you’d like to start your own festival ministry team. If so, we can train you and your people – or just give advice.

Currently, I’m looking to create a small team of people for Burning Man 2017, which is pretty much recognized as the ultimate transformational festival. With over 70,000 participants in the Nevada desert, it is (I believe) the largest such festival in the world. And while it’s still many months off (“The man burns in 304 days!”), planning needs to start now. Tickets usually go on sale in January. It isn’t cheap. and it’ll test you. But for many festival people, it is their favorite festival. I think it is my favorite. Do you think this is something you could do? Let me know.

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How can I help you? Do you have a dream you need interpreted? Do you need healing for trauma or emotional wounds, or do you just feel “stuck”? Are you part of a group that is interested in prophetic evangelism and outreach? I offer personal ministry, in person or via Skype, and personal or group training.


Call To Action

207927_10151038686802337_1676522867_nYesterday I wrote a blog listing the various crazy festival outreaches I’ll be ministering at in 2016. It is crazy ministry with other crazy ministers ministering to crazy people. It is great fun and I love it. All of those outreaches, except one, are pretty much a sure thing. I’ve done all of them in the past, so they’re not an unknown quantity. Only one is in question, and that one is Burning Man.

Burning Man is my favorite festival. It is wild, it’s in the desert, it’s raucous, hours from anywhere, with amazing examples of self-expression. It also the most demanding. It’s demanding physically, emotionally, and demands a lot of money to do. A person going to Burning Man can expect to spend a minimum of a thousand dollars. But the festival goers are hungry for spiritual reality…

As of yet, I don’t have a team committed to going this year. I went alone last year, and I absolutely loved it, as I always have. It remains to be seen whether I’ll go alone this year. If I cannot put together a team, it will likely be my last year.

So this is pretty much a last minute call for a team. Have you ever thought of going to minister there? If so, let me know right away, and also go and check out the Burning Man website as soon as possible. Sign up for the newsletter (this is crucial) called “The Jackrabbit Speaks”. Look at their list of Important Dates and the ticket page.

God bless you. It’s not easy to get in, it’s not easy to get there, it’s not easy to Be there. But it sure is fun.

I’m looking for Special Forces kinds of people!

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Who’s Going To Burning Man With Me?

IMG_2981Well, once again, I’ve procrastinated and am late in starting to plan for Burning Man 2016. Every year, on the way home from Burning Man, I tell myself, the time to start planning for next year is now. I have yet to heed my very wise counsel.

Tickets usually go on sale in January, but there’s no word yet on that as the Burning Man org fights with greedy politicians who want to choke dollars from the burning goose. In any case, time is short for drawing a team together, which is the reason for this blog post. It is part of our larger vision to plant churches at festivals. There are what may be considered to be churches already planted at this one, including ours. We want to not only maintain that, but expand its creativity and increase its influence.

So who wants to go? We’re looking for reasonably healthy, independent, creative crazy people with ideas. We want people who can not only help us with our crazy ideas, but who might be able to come up with some crazy ideas of their own, if not this year, then in subsequent years. In other words, we want to draw attention at Burning Man. And in fact, we have. They kind of know who we are there.

Here are some of the things we have done at Burning Man:

We’ve built interactive art projects. We hope to build another one this year. Maybe you have an idea for an art project of your own.

We’ve done dream interpretation and healing in our camp. One year, we did a sort of good cop/bad cop thing, in which Phil did some hilarious card reading which always contained bad news for the person getting the reading, and then I would give a real blessing to the person with words of knowledge, giving them good news. Entertainment/drama which blesses can be very powerful and keep you very busy.

IMG_1508_1024We have done dream interpretation and healing at Center Camp. There is space there for performance arts. I’d really like to see people doing something like that there.

We’ve hobnobbed with other Burners on art cars, in their camps, etc., to expand our impact so as to be a blessing to this community.

207927_10151038686802337_1676522867_nGoing to Burning Man is not easy. The environment is harsh (it’s a desert). It’s expensive. Figure about $1,000 plus your travel expenses. And you’ll need a week or more of your time. And there will be preparations as a team member between now and then. But not only will you change lives there, your contribution will be spread much wider than the barren desert of Nevada. And you’ll be changed too. Burning Man will change you. I’ve found the change to be absolutely amazing. So will you.

E-mail me at huxleydennis@gmail.com, or reach me via Facebook.